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  NxtLib
 
 

 

Learning OOP with robotics

(NEW: Support for Lego Mindstorms EV3. Consult EV3JLib)

In modern programming courses, the concepts of object oriented programming play a major role, especially when using Java. For beginners, teaching-by-examples is an essential teaching paradigma. But the examples for the class design have to be selected as concrete as possible in order to show that there is close mapping between real objects and their abstract counterpart as software objects. Modeling real objects into software objects let the student feel the essence of OOP.

What can be more concrete and touchable than a robot? It is well-known that robotics provides a formidable playground for teaching OOP. The real robot can easily be modeled in software and acquiring a robot means instantiating a class object. Evidently the real robot has parts like motors, gears, arms, actuators, sensors, etc. These objects correspond to instances of software classes and are software components of the robot class (has-a-relationship). The robot can be steered by commands like turning on motors and reading sensors. In software these commands are represented by methods of the robot classes. Finally the robot becomes more and more intelligent by expanding its possibilites (class derivation, is-a-relationship).

 
 
Assembling the parts of a robot like motors and sensors can be modeled very closely by constructing a robot class in a object-oriented programming language.
 

Since a few years the Lego NXT brick is a good choice for the teaching and hobby environment. The Lego kit is a good compromise between performance and affordability. When shipped, the Lego firmware runs on the brick's microprocessor. But there are alternatives: One comes from leJOS and contains a Java interpreter. The firmware is able to communicate via Bluetooth with another device like a host computer or a mobile phone. When the brick is started, the firmware listens for commands and reacts accordingly (turns motors on, reports back values of sensors, etc.). Moreover programs may be downloaded into the brick and executed standalone. Therefore two distinct modes of operation the NXT are possible: Either the NXT is controlled by a user program running on a host (we call this "direct mode") or a user program is downloaded and runs standalone on the brick (we call this "autonomous mode"). Both modes have their pros and cons, both are important and widely used in commercial and technical robot applications.


The NxtJLib Java Library

NxtJLib is a Java library for the direct mode that runs on a host computer. A library called NxtJLibMP with exactly the same functionality runs on Java-enabled mobile phones. A third version NxtJLibA provides the same OOP functionalities on top of the NXJ library for standalone programs that are uploaded into the NXT brick ('A' stands for autonomous mode). The libraries NxtJLib/NxtJLIbMP for the host controlled mode are inspired by the leJOS direct command software and use some low level code from the leJOS source distribution, but are otherwise independent of the leJOS distribution. Only bricks running the leJOS firmware are supported. The Bluetooth communication uses the BlueCove library for J2SE, the standard JSR-82 implementation for J2ME and the Android Bluetooth classes for Android smartphones. More than one NXT brick (with different Bluetooth names) may be operated at the same time.

When the robot is working, lot of events occur: The touch sensor bounces against a wall, sound is detected, light is turned on, etc. The best way to handle these events in software is by using the Java event model: An event method (callback) is declared and registered. Whenever the event occurs, this method is automatically invoked. The NxtJLib implements the event model for all sensors by polling them with a internal thread at regular time intervals. Instead of writing old fashioned programs by polling the sensors in the user code constantly, the user may focus on modern event driven algorithms based on the structure: "Whenever something happens do the following...".

In few words: NxtJLib inspires the student to write pleasent Java code with a clean OOP design.

 

A first example

The following program shows the fundamental concept of NxtJLib. A robot is created and the Bluetooth link established. Then two motors are created and assembled into to robot. Hereafter the robot is used. In the end the robot is disconnected and the program terminates.

// NxtDemo.java

import
 ch.aplu.nxt.*;

public
 class NxtDemo
{
  
public NxtDemo()
  
{
    
// Ask for the name, create robot and connect
    NxtRobot robot 
= new NxtRobot();

    
// Create two motors
    Motor motA 
= new Motor(MotorPort.A);
    Motor motB 
= new Motor(MotorPort.B);

    
// Assemble motors into robot
    robot.
addPart(motA);
    robot.
addPart(motB);

    
// Use motors
    motA.
forward();
    motB.
forward();

    
// Wait a moment
    Tools.
delay(5000);

    
// Disconnect and terminate
    robot.
exit();
  
}

  
public static void main(String[] args)
  
{
    
new NxtDemo();
  
}
}

Execute using WebStart (NXT brick with leJOS firmware needed)

 

With the Gidlet framework for mobile phones, the program for a Java-enabled handy looks almost the same. Just add another include line and move the code from the constructor to the main method:

  // NxtDemoGidlet.java

import
 ch.aplu.gidlet.*;
import
 ch.aplu.nxt.*;

public
 class NxtDemoGidlet extends Gidlet
{
  
public void main()
  
{
    
// Same code as above
  
}
}

Download JAR/JAD files for installation on mobile phone (NXT brick needed)

In both applications the parameterless constructor of NxtRobot is used. In this case an input dialog is automatically displayed where the Bluetooth name can be entered.

The class design of NxtJLib is clean and straightforward. A simplified class diagram is shown below:

 

 

Complete class diagram